Mystery & Mayhem: Commissario Guido Brunetti

Donna Leon

  1. Death at La Fenice — 
  2. Death in a Strange Country
  3. The Anonymous Venetian (a.k.a. Dressed for Death)
  4. A Venetian Reckoning (a.k.a Death and Judgment)
  5. Acqua Alta (a.k.a. Death in High Water)
  6. The Death of Faith (a.k.a Quietly in Their Sleep)
  7. A Noble Radiance
  8. Fatal Remedies
  9. Friends in High Places
  10. A Sea of Troubles
  11. Willful Behavior
  12. Uniform Justice
  13. Doctored Evidence
  14. Blood from a Stone
  15. Through a Glass, Darkly
  16. Suffer the Little Children
  17. The Girl of His Dreams
  18. About Face
  19. A Question of Belief
  20. Drawing Conclusions
  21. Beastly Things
  22. The Golden Egg
  23. By Its Cover 
  24. Falling in Love 
  25. The Waters of Eternal Youth
  26. Earthly Remains 
  27. The Temptation of Forgiveness 
  28. Unto Us a Son Is Given 
szekely_venice

“Venice, Italy” by Pedro Szekely. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Generic 2.0 (CC BY-SA 2.0)

 

June Stack

This month I pledge to not buy any new books until I make a significant dent in the books I’ve bought recently. I want to finish two books I started reading earlier in the year — The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra and Fahrenheit 451. I also want to make some progress on the 2019 Read Harder Challenge, as my completion rate is currently 3/24. I blame my tendency to read “airport thrillers”1That is, pulpy thrillers engrossing enough to make you forget you’re stuck in the airport; thrillers which are often conveniently available for purchase in airport bookstores.after a long day of studying or writing for this disappointing ratio.

But summer brings more sunlight and more time for leisure reading. If the reading takes place near a frosty cold brew or bubbly rosé, so much the better.

A heavy workload in my MLIS program at Syracuse University slowed my reading down this spring, but I hope to return to my usual pace this month. I’ve added an ambitious 20 titles to my June TBR stack, which I’ve posted below to motivate myself!

Books to finish reading in June:

  1. The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra by Vassem Kahn
  2. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury2My niece read this for a tenth grade Honors English assignment, and since I’ve never read it, I thought I would read along with her.
  3. Pietr the Latvian by Georges Simenon
  4. The Essential Drucker: The Best of Sixty Years of Peter Drucker’s Essential Writings on Management by Peter F. Drucker3This is a required text for my management class that I found strangely compelling.
  5. The Champion’s Mind by Jim Afremow4I am reading this book as part of an independent study project for my management class.

Cover image of Pietr the Latvian by Georges Simenon

Books to read in June:

  1. American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson
  2. Let Me Hear a Rhyme by Tiffany D. Jackson
  3. All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung
  4. The Sleep Solution by W. Chris Winter
  5. The Library Book by Susan Orlean
  6. Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss
  7. Spin by Lamar Giles

Cover image of Spin by Lamar Giles

Poetry to read in June:

  1. How to Know the Flowers by Jessica Smith
  2. The Carrying by Ada Limon
  3. Ghost Of by Diana Khoi Nguyen

Cover image of How to Know the Flowers by Jessica Smith

Graphic novels to read in June:

  1. This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki
  2. Goldie Vance, Volume One by Hope Larson, Brittney Williams, and Sarah Stern
  3. Shoplifter by Michael Cho
  4. House of Women by Sophie Goldstein
  5. Beautiful Darkness by Fabien Vehlmann and Kerascoët; translated by Helge Dascher

Panel from This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki

1 April 2019

For the ninth(!) year in a row, I’m participating in NaPoWriMo (or GloPoWriMo if you’re free from these United States). Writing 30 poems in 30 days sounds daunting, but trying to achieve that goal has always been an extremely generative process for me. My first attempt at #NaPoWriMo involved a secret pact — and a secret password-protected blog! — with a poet whose poetry and practice I admire. She taught me a lot about writing within a compressed time frame and suppressing my editorial impulses when creating a first draft of a poem. These lessons capture the core mission of National/Global Poetry Writing Month (or any other 30/30 writing challenge). All too many poets, regardless of their level of experience, get blocked in their writing because they start editing even before they have written anything at all. NaPoWriMo invites me to limit the demands I put on each poem by demanding that I limit the amount of time I spend bringing that poem into the world. I write as many poems as I can each April and then edit them at my leisure.

The poems I write during April often figure into other poetry projects I pursue throughout the year, so I rarely follow the daily prompts although I highly recommend using prompts, especially with writing groups or creative writing students. I am still centering my #writeeveryday efforts on using the predictive text algorithm in my phone’s memo application to write poetry. (I (still) have a Samsung Galaxy S7.) So far, the algorithm and I have produced some solid work. Most people remain skeptical of the poetic potential of their predictive text function, but I encourage you to explore ways to disrupt the algorithm’s rhythm. You’d be surprised at the results.

Today’s #NaPoWriMo prompt is to write a poem that provides the reader with instructions on how to do something, which is a classic. I have used it myself and with students many, many times. I didn’t even read the prompt until after I wrote my poem for today, but I think I might come back to it later in the month.

I usually keep the majority of my #NaPoWriMo posts private or remove the poem after a few days in case I want to submit it for publication in the future, but I’ve posted a screenshot of my April 1 poem below. Did you know about my obsession with Alexander the Great? And my further obsession with Mary Renault‘s novels about Alexander the Great? Now you do.

Screenshot_20190401_1Apr19

 

“untouched and still possible”

To the New Year

With what stillness at last
you appear in the valley
your first sunlight reaching down
to touch the tips of a few
high leaves that do not stir
as though they had not noticed
and did not know you at all
then the voice of a dove calls
from far away in itself

to the hush of the morning
so this is the sound of you
here and now whether or not
anyone hears it this is
where we have come with our age
our knowledge such as it is
and our hopes such as they are
invisible before us
untouched and still possible

W. S. Merwin

What I Read (September 2018)

  1. Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal
  2. Let’s Talk about Love by Claire Kann
  3. The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn
  4. Baby Teeth by Zoje Stage
  5. Any Man by Amber Tamblyn
  6. Two Dark Reigns by Kendare Blake
  7. Gilded Cage by Vic James
  8. What We Lose by Zinzi Clemmons
  9. Tarnished City by Vic James
  10. My Not So Perfect Life by Sophie Kinsella
  11. Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman
  12. Bright Ruin by Vic James
  13. Vox by Christina Dalcher
  14. Are You Sleeping by Kathleen Barber
  15. Black Magick, Volume 1: Awakening, Part One by Greg Rucka & Nicola Scott
  16. Monday’s Not Coming by Tiffany D. Jackson
  17. Artemis by Andy Weir
  18. Monstress, Vol. 1: Awakening by Marjorie M. Liu & Sana Takeda
  19. Monstress, Vol. 2: The Blood by Marjorie M. Liu & Sana Takeda
  20. Monstress, Vol. 3: Haven by Marjorie M. Liu & Sana Takeda
  21. Suicide Squad, Volume 1: Kicked in the Teeth by Adam Glass
  22. Black Magick, Volume 1: Awakening, Part Two by Greg Rucka & Nicola Scott
  23. Little Darlings by Melanie Golding
  24. Hannah-Beast by Jennifer McMahon
  25. Still Lives by Maria Hummel
  26. Tradition by Brendan Kiely
  27. Oak Avenue by Brandi Reeds

blackmagick_09-1

What I Read (August 2018)

  1. The Sinner by Petra Hammesfahr (translated by John Brownjohn)
  2. The Similars by Rebecca Hanover
  3. Persons Unknown by Susie Steiner
  4. The Weight of Blood by Laura McHugh
  5. An Extraordinary Union by Alyssa Cole
  6. All Things Cease to Appear by Elizabeth Brundage
  7. The Accident Season by Möira Fowley-Doyle
  8. Nyxia by Scott Reintgen
  9. Nyxia Unleashed by Scott Reintgen
  10. The Last Mrs. Parrish by Liv Constantine
  11. Before We Met by Lucie Whitehouse

2 April 2018

I didn’t not follow the Day 2 prompt for NaPoWriMo, which encourages participants to write a poem “that plays with voice.” I just didn’t challenge myself to use voice in a different way than I have been using it recently. The poems in my Predictive Text series frequently conflate “you” (second-person point of view) with “I” (first-person point of view), and since the “I” in these poems is a loosely fictionalized version of me (that is, me, Gillian actual), this fluidity between pronouns allows readers to imagine the events in these poems as happening to them. In theory, this shift in point of view that positions readers as the speaker of the poem should make the details of the poem feel more universal (as opposed to highly personal). In theory.

Currently, my Introduction to Creative Writing students at Wheelock College are reading Citizen by Claudia Rankine, a book which uses “you” to challenge the reader’s position in a powerful and evocative way. If you haven’t read Citizen yet, put that book on hold at your local library tout de suite! In the meantime, you can read excerpts here, here, here, and here. Afterwards, try to answer the question I asked my students to reflect on:

In Citizen, Claudia Rankine addresses “you” throughout the book. Where do you recognize yourself in the encounters described in Citizen, if at all? What perspectives or angles of experience were you surprised to inhabit, and why? How does Rankine’s choice to use second person point of view affect your experience as a reader? How does Rankine’s choice to use second person point of view affect your experience as a citizen?

(question courtesy of the National Endowments for the Arts reader’s guide for Citizen)

I’ve posted my 2/30 draft below. It disappointed me right away, and I’ve already revised it multiple times, but here’s the original version:

2018-04-02 10.11.06

1 April 2018

I’m folding this year’s NaPoWriMo challenge into my #writeeveryday goal, and I will post my drafts, or portions of them, here throughout the month. Lately, I’ve been experimenting with using the memo app on my phone to write poems loosely based on events in my life; it’s a play on the daybook concept Jessica has been exploring (read excerpts here, here, here, and read more about Jessica’s daybooks project here) one in which I also explore the limitations (and possibilities) of the predictive text function on my phone.

Today’s prompt did inspire this poem, although I stuck closer to the prompt’s inspiration (Lauren Russell’s exercise which invites writers to consider the body’s capacity for monstrosity and pleasure, shame and desire) than to the idea of a secret shame or guilty pleasure.

2018-04-01 18.19.00

Second resident reading, Tuesday January 21

I asked the talented and witty John Berry to document our second resident reading, and he did a lovely job. Voilà:

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo, drawn by John G. Berry

Phil Palmedo, drawn by John G. Berry

Jenna

Jenna McGuiggan

Jenna McGuiggan drawn by John G. Berry

Jenna McGuiggan, drawn by John G. Berry

Liz Edelglass

Liz Edelglass

Liz Edelglass, drawn by John G. Berry

Liz Edelglass, drawn by John G. Berry

Catherine Despont

Catherine Despont

Catherine Despont, drawn by John G. Berry

Catherine Despont, drawn by John G. Berry

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux, drawn by John G. Berry

Gillian Devereux, drawn by John G. Berry

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins, drawn by John G. Berry

Char Wilkins, drawn by John G. Berry