Mystery & Mayhem: Commissario Guido Brunetti

Donna Leon

  1. Death at La Fenice — 
  2. Death in a Strange Country
  3. The Anonymous Venetian (a.k.a. Dressed for Death)
  4. A Venetian Reckoning (a.k.a Death and Judgment)
  5. Acqua Alta (a.k.a. Death in High Water)
  6. The Death of Faith (a.k.a Quietly in Their Sleep)
  7. A Noble Radiance
  8. Fatal Remedies
  9. Friends in High Places
  10. A Sea of Troubles
  11. Willful Behavior
  12. Uniform Justice
  13. Doctored Evidence
  14. Blood from a Stone
  15. Through a Glass, Darkly
  16. Suffer the Little Children
  17. The Girl of His Dreams
  18. About Face
  19. A Question of Belief
  20. Drawing Conclusions
  21. Beastly Things
  22. The Golden Egg
  23. By Its Cover 
  24. Falling in Love 
  25. The Waters of Eternal Youth
  26. Earthly Remains 
  27. The Temptation of Forgiveness 
  28. Unto Us a Son Is Given 
szekely_venice

“Venice, Italy” by Pedro Szekely. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Generic 2.0 (CC BY-SA 2.0)

 

June Stack

This month I pledge to not buy any new books until I make a significant dent in the books I’ve bought recently. I want to finish two books I started reading earlier in the year — The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra and Fahrenheit 451. I also want to make some progress on the 2019 Read Harder Challenge, as my completion rate is currently 3/24. I blame my tendency to read “airport thrillers”1That is, pulpy thrillers engrossing enough to make you forget you’re stuck in the airport; thrillers which are often conveniently available for purchase in airport bookstores.after a long day of studying or writing for this disappointing ratio.

But summer brings more sunlight and more time for leisure reading. If the reading takes place near a frosty cold brew or bubbly rosé, so much the better.

A heavy workload in my MLIS program at Syracuse University slowed my reading down this spring, but I hope to return to my usual pace this month. I’ve added an ambitious 20 titles to my June TBR stack, which I’ve posted below to motivate myself!

Books to finish reading in June:

  1. The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra by Vassem Kahn
  2. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury2My niece read this for a tenth grade Honors English assignment, and since I’ve never read it, I thought I would read along with her.
  3. Pietr the Latvian by Georges Simenon
  4. The Essential Drucker: The Best of Sixty Years of Peter Drucker’s Essential Writings on Management by Peter F. Drucker3This is a required text for my management class that I found strangely compelling.
  5. The Champion’s Mind by Jim Afremow4I am reading this book as part of an independent study project for my management class.

Cover image of Pietr the Latvian by Georges Simenon

Books to read in June:

  1. American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson
  2. Let Me Hear a Rhyme by Tiffany D. Jackson
  3. All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung
  4. The Sleep Solution by W. Chris Winter
  5. The Library Book by Susan Orlean
  6. Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss
  7. Spin by Lamar Giles

Cover image of Spin by Lamar Giles

Poetry to read in June:

  1. How to Know the Flowers by Jessica Smith
  2. The Carrying by Ada Limon
  3. Ghost Of by Diana Khoi Nguyen

Cover image of How to Know the Flowers by Jessica Smith

Graphic novels to read in June:

  1. This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki
  2. Goldie Vance, Volume One by Hope Larson, Brittney Williams, and Sarah Stern
  3. Shoplifter by Michael Cho
  4. House of Women by Sophie Goldstein
  5. Beautiful Darkness by Fabien Vehlmann and Kerascoët; translated by Helge Dascher

Panel from This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki

Plans and Projects

I have wanted to do a writing residency at the Vermont Studio Center since I first finished my MFA program in 2000. Obviously, once I learned I’d been accepted, I started plotting and making plans for my time here. I have high hopes for them all.

Writing plans and projects:

  1. My year in Tarot — For several years I have been receiving a tarot card accompanied by a very generalized reading from www.astrology.com/tarot every day in my email. I believe that everyone who subscribes to this service receives the same card, which seems to be a flaw in this particular divination system. Since the cards, as in any Tarot reading, are pulled at a random, it is also possible to receive the same card two days (or more) in a row. I thought it would be interesting to do an erasure of each day’s Tarot card/reading over the course of a year. So that is what I’m doing and will be doing for the foreseeable future. Right now the erasure I made for the card I received on January 6th (the Devil) is my favorite.
  2. Taylor Swift sentence poems — Honestly, I am always looking for ways to write poems about Taylor Swift. I would argue that I am not (yet) obsessed with Taylor Swift, but I am awfully interested in her/her work/listening to her songs on repeat/watching her videos on YouTube/wearing my official Taylor Swift shirt that says “Like Ever” on it. I am also always looking for a new way to approach writing a poem. I’ve recently become interested in writing a poem that consists only of one grammatical sentence. So I’ve begun a series of one sentence Taylor Swift poems. So far, my favorite one is called “If I Were 14 Years Old, I Would Think Taylor Swift Is a Genius,” which is also a line I once used in an OK Cupid profile.
  3. Secret Jane Eyre poetry project — I am obsessed with the novel Jane Eyre and the Brontës, and lately I’ve become more and more interested in experimenting with visual poetry. I’ve been doing quite a bit of erasure poetry lately (You can see two examples here at Printer’s Devil Review. Be aware that the cover of this issue is a little provocative and perhaps even NSFW, depending on how prurient your workplace is.), but I think I want to push my boundaries some more, and I think Jane Eyre will help me accomplish this goal. There’s not much more to say about this project other than I made two separate trips to the art supply store here in Johnson, VT.
  4. Complete erasure chapbook based on the collection of Cornell University nature-study pamphlets I found on Project Gutenberg. While visiting my mom in San Diego this summer, I discovered this amazing collection of nature-study pamphlets curated by Liberty H. Bailey, Jr., a renowned “plantsman” who apparently created “nature study” while teaching  agriculture at Cornell. The language and style of these pamphlets both delight and baffle me. I brought 10 completed erasures based on these pamphlets to Vermont, so now I want to edit, order, and expand my collection with a few more poems.
  5. Create a full length poetry manuscript, tentatively titled In the Past You Were the Future. I would like to try and fit my chapbook Focus on Grammar, my Letters from the Future series (read two of them here at Anti-), my apocalyptic postcard poems, and some other poetry into one cohesive manuscript. I also imagine I will have some editing of individual poems and some writing of new poems to complement the existing poems to do. Wish me luck!
  6. Reorder and revise All About, my manuscript of loosely linked prose poems. I love these poems, and they have been well received by editors and audiences (at poetry readings), but this manuscript needs some work. Because I wrote it over a year and a half, and usually wrote a short series of 3-5 poems each time, I’m having a lot of trouble ordering in a way that creates a logical, engaging narrative. I also suspect that when the poems are in a new order I’ll discover some continuity errors and overused words. I’ve already found the word suddenly in at least six places.
  7. Write new poems. Maybe about the future. Maybe about the hit television show The Voice.
  8. Work on some prose projects I’ve been considering. Why not?

If I finish all my planned projects, or take a break, I plan to read some (if not all) of the books I brought:

  • The Babies by Sabrina Orah Mark
  • Beyond Black by Hilary Mantel
  • Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter edited by Ellen Schendel and William J. Macauley, Jr.
  • Elizabeth of York by Alison Weir
  • ESL Writers: A Guide for Writing Center Tutors edited by Shanti Bruce and Ben Rafoth
  • The Haiku Handbook by William H. Higginson
  • In the Pines by Alice Notley 
  • Isle of Youth by Laura Van Den Berg
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  • The Life of Poetry by Muriel Rukeyser
  • Mary Queen of Scots by Antonia Frasier
  • The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  • Night Film by Marisha Pessl
  • Paterson by William Carlos Williams
  • The Pillow Book of Sei Shnagan translated by Ivan Morris
  • A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver
  • The Self Unstable by Elisa Gabbert
  • Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace by Joseph M. Williams 
  • Tsim Tsum by Sabrina Orah Mark

Some of these books are ones I want/need to read for work. So, I suppose that, as a last resort, I could also do some work for work while I’m here.