Forecasting the Future

Tonight Leonid Lerman, a visiting sculptor here at VSC this week, gave a slide talk about his work and life. I am a little in love with him. I found his talk/work so inspiring that I went back to my studio around 9 p.m. and wrote a long (7 page) erasure about prophecy and the future and my obsession with apocalyptic visions.

You can see the first page/section of the poem, titled “Forecasting the Future” below. (Click the picture to enlarge the screenshot.)

Screenshot 2014-01-16 09.41.34

My source text for this erasure is What Is Coming: A Forecast of Things After the War, written by H.G. Wells in 1916.

 

The Things I’ve Seen, In Pictures You Can Click to Enlarge

melancholy along the moors

12 Jan 2014

The river has begun to win its battle with the ice, but the sky today stayed grey Jane Eyreand clouded. I’m still working on my semi-secret Jane Eyre project, and today I decided to create a playlist for Jane to listen to as she wandered the countryside.

I wanted to imagine her rocking out as she walked melancholy along the moors. I also wanted to revision the party scene where Jane is sitting quietly in the corner wearing her best dress (the silver grey one) so that it looked more like the Robyn video for “Dancing on My Own.”

your little month

The title of this blog comes from the following sonnet by Edna St. Vincent Millay, one of my poetic kindred souls. I love the line so make the most of this, your little day and often recite it to myself as a reminder to focus on the present moment while remaining bold enough to embrace the vastness of long creative projects.

Edna St. Vincent Millay
IV
I shall forget you presently, my dear,
So make the most of this, your little day,
Your little month, your little half a year,
Ere I forget, or die, or move away,
And we are done forever; by and by
I shall forget you, as I said, but now,
If you entreat me with your loveliest lie
I will protest you with my favorite vow.
I would indeed that love were longer-lived,
And vows were not so brittle as they are,
But so it is, and nature has contrived
To struggle on without a break thus far, —
Whether or not we find what we are seeking
Is idle, biologically speaking.

White Blank Page

011414_bulletinboard

When I look up from my blank computer screen or paper, I can look out the window (beautiful but sometimes distracting) or at my bulletin board (ugly and sometimes depressing). My bulletin board is not as blank as it was when I first arrived, but I would love to have something lively to hang up there and inspire me. If you have small(ish) children, I would welcome their artwork or letters, as well as their book and music recommendations. I also accept photographs, postcards, tiny animals, books, adult beverages, homemade cookies, and gifts of all sizes. You can send me mail c/o VSC by the overworked yet reliable U.S. Postal Service (P.O. Box 613, Johnson, VT, 05656) or the recently maligned UPS and FedEx (80 Pearl Street, Johnson, VT, 05656). I leave VSC on January 31st.

Also, if you are someone who happens to have my email address or telephone number, you should know that both my cell service and my internet access are somewhat precarious. If you send me an email, I will definitely get it sometime that day. I may or may not be able to take your call or call you, but I can almost always receive and send texts. It is very hard to use Twitter and Tumblr, since the internet is shared by so many people, so you may not see me on those sites as often as usual. And you will see me on Facebook as often as you ever do, which is to say rarely if ever.

Plans and Projects

I have wanted to do a writing residency at the Vermont Studio Center since I first finished my MFA program in 2000. Obviously, once I learned I’d been accepted, I started plotting and making plans for my time here. I have high hopes for them all.

Writing plans and projects:

  1. My year in Tarot — For several years I have been receiving a tarot card accompanied by a very generalized reading from www.astrology.com/tarot every day in my email. I believe that everyone who subscribes to this service receives the same card, which seems to be a flaw in this particular divination system. Since the cards, as in any Tarot reading, are pulled at a random, it is also possible to receive the same card two days (or more) in a row. I thought it would be interesting to do an erasure of each day’s Tarot card/reading over the course of a year. So that is what I’m doing and will be doing for the foreseeable future. Right now the erasure I made for the card I received on January 6th (the Devil) is my favorite.
  2. Taylor Swift sentence poems — Honestly, I am always looking for ways to write poems about Taylor Swift. I would argue that I am not (yet) obsessed with Taylor Swift, but I am awfully interested in her/her work/listening to her songs on repeat/watching her videos on YouTube/wearing my official Taylor Swift shirt that says “Like Ever” on it. I am also always looking for a new way to approach writing a poem. I’ve recently become interested in writing a poem that consists only of one grammatical sentence. So I’ve begun a series of one sentence Taylor Swift poems. So far, my favorite one is called “If I Were 14 Years Old, I Would Think Taylor Swift Is a Genius,” which is also a line I once used in an OK Cupid profile.
  3. Secret Jane Eyre poetry project — I am obsessed with the novel Jane Eyre and the Brontës, and lately I’ve become more and more interested in experimenting with visual poetry. I’ve been doing quite a bit of erasure poetry lately (You can see two examples here at Printer’s Devil Review. Be aware that the cover of this issue is a little provocative and perhaps even NSFW, depending on how prurient your workplace is.), but I think I want to push my boundaries some more, and I think Jane Eyre will help me accomplish this goal. There’s not much more to say about this project other than I made two separate trips to the art supply store here in Johnson, VT.
  4. Complete erasure chapbook based on the collection of Cornell University nature-study pamphlets I found on Project Gutenberg. While visiting my mom in San Diego this summer, I discovered this amazing collection of nature-study pamphlets curated by Liberty H. Bailey, Jr., a renowned “plantsman” who apparently created “nature study” while teaching  agriculture at Cornell. The language and style of these pamphlets both delight and baffle me. I brought 10 completed erasures based on these pamphlets to Vermont, so now I want to edit, order, and expand my collection with a few more poems.
  5. Create a full length poetry manuscript, tentatively titled In the Past You Were the Future. I would like to try and fit my chapbook Focus on Grammar, my Letters from the Future series (read two of them here at Anti-), my apocalyptic postcard poems, and some other poetry into one cohesive manuscript. I also imagine I will have some editing of individual poems and some writing of new poems to complement the existing poems to do. Wish me luck!
  6. Reorder and revise All About, my manuscript of loosely linked prose poems. I love these poems, and they have been well received by editors and audiences (at poetry readings), but this manuscript needs some work. Because I wrote it over a year and a half, and usually wrote a short series of 3-5 poems each time, I’m having a lot of trouble ordering in a way that creates a logical, engaging narrative. I also suspect that when the poems are in a new order I’ll discover some continuity errors and overused words. I’ve already found the word suddenly in at least six places.
  7. Write new poems. Maybe about the future. Maybe about the hit television show The Voice.
  8. Work on some prose projects I’ve been considering. Why not?

If I finish all my planned projects, or take a break, I plan to read some (if not all) of the books I brought:

  • The Babies by Sabrina Orah Mark
  • Beyond Black by Hilary Mantel
  • Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter edited by Ellen Schendel and William J. Macauley, Jr.
  • Elizabeth of York by Alison Weir
  • ESL Writers: A Guide for Writing Center Tutors edited by Shanti Bruce and Ben Rafoth
  • The Haiku Handbook by William H. Higginson
  • In the Pines by Alice Notley 
  • Isle of Youth by Laura Van Den Berg
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  • The Life of Poetry by Muriel Rukeyser
  • Mary Queen of Scots by Antonia Frasier
  • The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  • Night Film by Marisha Pessl
  • Paterson by William Carlos Williams
  • The Pillow Book of Sei Shnagan translated by Ivan Morris
  • A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver
  • The Self Unstable by Elisa Gabbert
  • Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace by Joseph M. Williams 
  • Tsim Tsum by Sabrina Orah Mark

Some of these books are ones I want/need to read for work. So, I suppose that, as a last resort, I could also do some work for work while I’m here.